Best pick up for commuting?

If I drive 40 miles to school everyday is there a pickup that can get 25-30mpg?

Even if I had to add mods like a cold air intake or a chip

I really want a Sierra or Silverado 1500.

Are Sonoma's, Colorado's, S10's or Canyons any good as far as reliability and gas mileage go?

Any help would be

If I drive 40 miles to school everyday is there a pickup that can get 25-30mpg?

Even if I had to add mods like a cold air intake or a chip

I really want a Sierra or Silverado 1500.

Are Sonoma's, Colorado's, S10's or Canyons any good as far as reliability and gas mileage go?

Any help would be appreciated!

Other answer:

DIRK NOWITZKI:
No amount of mods will let you get 30 mpg out of a Silverado 1500. However the 5.3L can get close, with 23 mpg highway.

The only new full sozed truck (that's on sale today) that will achieve 25 mpg is a Ram 1500. Either as the HFE package or with the Ecodiesel engine. A Toyota Tacoma is smaller and will get 25mpg with the base engine in single cab configuration.

The HFE package is a single cab short box truck with the 3.6L V6. It is rated at 25 mpg highway.

The ecodiesel is an engine option for the Ram 1500 that is rated at 28 mpg highway. However diesel in the USA is more expensive than regular gas, so this must be taken into consideration.

An S10 is reliable however they're aging and it is hard to find a good used low mileage one. A 4 cylinder 2wd model may be able to get 30mpg if you hypermill, they were rated 28mpg highway.

The Colorado and canyon are nice little trucks, but were never known for amazing fuel efficiency. However a base model 2wd 4 cylinder will get 26 mpg highway.

monkeyboy:
In other words, no. You can't add snake oil garbage (which is what you list, sorry) to increase MPG. You reduce displacment, vehicle weight, and aerodynamic drag to increase fuel efficiency. Seeing that many modern sedans will get roughly 30MPG freeway, a truck isn't getting there without going diesel as mentioned. Trucks today aren't even close to double fuel economy trucks were getting in the 70's…that should give you a clue that the problem is the shape and weight, not the drivetrain, which is completely different today than back then. Cars on the other hand have more than doubled economy in the same time frame, but have become substantially smaller (in econobox size) and with substantially smaller displacement engines.
big:
a burner toyota or nissan would get close to that
bobby:
ford f650