Can a gust of wind ever be so strong that it actually flips a plane over?

I am watching a video on youtube about turbulent landings and these gusts of wind are so strong they are actually pushing the plane sideways to where one wing is way above the other for a few seconds and these planes are very large commercial planes. Has there ever been a known case where wind has actually flipped

I am watching a video on youtube about turbulent landings and these gusts of wind are so strong they are actually pushing the plane sideways to where one wing is way above the other for a few seconds and these planes are very large commercial planes. Has there ever been a known case where wind has actually flipped a plane in flight?

Best Answer:

Skipper747: The winds you describe, in flight, would result in bad turbulence –

For takeoff and landing, strong winds are compensated with flying airplane at higher speeds –
As long as the winds are in the axis of the runway, it is not a problem –
Except… passenger comfort –

What you watch on the videos are spectacular 90ยบ angle crosswind landings –
Most such crosswinds of up to 30 knots can be handled by the average pilot –
Anything over that value, pilots attempting to land are reckless –

Most airplanes have a "demonstrated crosswind value" limitation –
The 747 maximum demonstrated crosswind is 30 knots (hand flown approach) –
If using the autoland, the limit is 15 knots –
Demonstrated… means a pilot can exceed it – and get fired if he crashes…!

Other answer:

Skipper747:
Not so much "flipped over", but sudden changes in wind direction has caused planes (even large ones) to crash in the past. A thing called a microburst, which is a sudden down draft, usually associated with a thunderstorm can be a big problem. Imagine our unsuspecting pilot is making his landing approach into a strong head wind. This isn't a problem as he's got his nice safe 150 knot airspeed and he's on the approach path just fine. Suddenly he flies though the microburst and his headwind suddenly becomes a tail wind in seconds. Now his airspeed is below the stall speed, and the plane drops like a brick. If he's only a couple of hundred feet up, there is no time or space to recover, and he crashes. He may or may not be upside down, depending on how severe the stall was, but he's crashed.

In gusty winds it's common to see pilots abort a landing because the wind is changing so much they can't keep the plane on a steady approach. A steady wind can be compensated for, gusty makes it hard because the planes airspeed is all over the place.

Here is a local airport on a windy day.
At 3:25 you see a 737 captain that's not happy with the approach so he does a go around from about 50 ft.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ba_OBVaf…

Barry:
A microburst could flip a plane, and wake turbulence can flip a light aircraft. Horizontal gusts probably would not flip a plane.
GLENDA:
We had what they call a plough wind go through here a few years ago. A number of small aircraft and a few larger ones were damaged severely. And yes, a few were flipped over.

As for flight conditions, airplanes have been known to enter severe turbulence and be flipped in mid air. One of our local pilots was severely injured when his plane was flipped in a mountain pass and made contact with a rock face before crashing to the ground due to wing damage. He was lucky to live through it.

Eric West:
Not going to happen in flight, although there have been very rare occasions where aircraft have been broken up by turbulence.

There have been many times when light aircraft, and even a few bigger ones have been flipped over by wind while parked.

It is not going to happen to something like a B737.

Fox:
light aircraft yes, you'll see it all the time after hurricanes and dust storms. But I don't think I have ever heard of a storm flipping over a full-size commercial airliner….the closest I have seen is a hurricane that had winds so strong it lifted the noseweheel of a 747 off the ground

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2FyErRxc…

Techwing:
Yes, there have been many cases, especially for small aircraft. It's unusual for an airliner to flip over, but it can be jarred sufficiently by the wind to cause a loss of control or a crash.
STEPHEN:
Planes are always being pushed sideways by the wind. Even a gentle breeze requires the pilot to make a correction.
I Am A Stranger Here:
I *think* a plane is stable unless the pilot chooses to flip/roll it. It's like a plane. It can move left to right or front to back, but it isn't easy to get under and flip. It's not so much about how strong the wind is as to how it "hits" the plane. Once it gets under the plane, it can flip it, but…
Nicholas:
You bet