How do I survive driving through the Canadian Rockies?

Okay, so I have next to no winter driving experience. I'm currently in Calgary and the one time that it's snowed, my car fishtailed across 2 lanes of traffic. I'm very concerned about the weather conditions, traffic, wildlife. Any basic tips for winter driving in the rockies?
Ok so it turns out that i was worried for nothing. The hardest part was the distractions, it became quite difficult to concentrate on the road after a while, so i pulled over and let my eyes adjust. Others were extremely aggressive drivers in the isolated patches, speed limit was 120km/h, they were going about

Ok so it turns out that i was worried for nothing. The hardest part was the distractions, it became quite difficult to concentrate on the road after a while, so i pulled over and let my eyes adjust. Others were extremely aggressive drivers in the isolated patches, speed limit was 120km/h, they were going about 150. In a sense, i can understand how driving a bit faster can save an hour or two over long stretches, but i just kept the speed limit. Also black ice.. fear the icy patches!!!!

Best Answer:

MrSupaPimpishlyDope: The TransCanada is regularly plowed, with active avalanche control. Chances are you can make it right across with no problem. But you need to allow time for problems and not kill yourself to make a 9am meeting or something. You obviously need practice in snow and in front of an 18-wheeler is not the best place to get it. Fishtailing sounds like too much gas, too low a gear, and probably summer tires. You need to drive like you were in a race – not reckless, the opposite. Being alert, aware of the road surface all the time, allowing for the limitations of the tires and traction, anticipating things far ahead, slowing appropriately before corners, realizing that behind a blind corner there might be a moose or a jack-knifed semi, having a plan to get up the road that isn t just driving the speed limit and hoping for the best. Also, plan for getting stuck – have clothes and boots so you can leave the car if you have to, gloves so you can fit chains without getting frostbite. (chains are a pain, and you probably won t need them, but they re cheap. You put them on to get up a steep icy hill, or when the police tell you to, and you can t drive at any speed)

Other answer:

MrSupaPimpishlyDope:
I cannot possibly compete with adaviel, but in addition to what they said, the vehicle is key, what may be a drive in the park for a RAM or an all wheel drive Charger, may be hell on earth for a Prius. If you drive like Miss Daisy is on a sunday drive in the back, have proper snow tyres, not 'all season or all weather tyres' SNOW TYRES! easy on the speed and turning, do not be afraid of slowing down with your four ways on, and bring blankets, food, flares or fusees, warning triangles, and a high viz jacket does not hurt the least bit. Always assume you will get into a ditch and be stuck, and be pleasantly surprised. If you are in a two wheel drive vehicle, check with the highway department for chain or tyre requirements, because they CAN, DO, AND WILL check.
lowlevel:
If you don't have winter tires on your vehicle, do yourself and everyone else a favour and stay home.

Otherwise, drive slow, don't follow too close, anticipate animals jumping out with little warning, and don't make any sudden or jerky movements of the wheel or pedals. Check road reports and don't go if there is black ice or heavy snowfall.

oklatom:
Safest. Don't drive.

If you must, carry chains if needed and get your car fitted with snow tires. Remember to slow down when conditions warrant that, and snow and ice warrant that.

logicalgal:
Take a winter driving lesson
Barry:
Anyone getting winter driving advice on this website needs to rethink their strategy. You need a lot more help than can fit in a few sentences.
ㅤ:
A thought shared.
Mordecai:
a
ANDRE L:
Yeah, take the train.
rick29148:
Chains on your car….