How do you deal with driving in the rain?

Today it rained liked I never seen before in California. I was driving and the rain got really heavy. My windshield wipers were at the maximum speed, but it was hard to see with so much rain hitting the windshield (looked liked frosted glass). It was also hard to see the dotted line between lanes. Then I reached an

Today it rained liked I never seen before in California. I was driving and the rain got really heavy. My windshield wipers were at the maximum speed, but it was hard to see with so much rain hitting the windshield (looked liked frosted glass). It was also hard to see the dotted line between lanes. Then I reached an area on a road that was flooded (I think less than a foot deep). I slowly drove through it like the other cars were doing.

What are some tips for driving in heavy rain? The rain I saw was so unexpected, I had never seen rain that heavy. It was like the water from your showerhead when you take a shower.

Best Answer:

☺: Slow down, turn on your headlights, use the wipers. If you live somewhere it never rains, you might not have enough tire tread (I heard a story years ago about all the bald tires in Egypt). You need wipers in good condition, and often washer fluid – in heavy traffic there can be a lot of road spray kicked up, and it's not clean.
Depending on road conditions, it may be safe to drive the speed limit. I mean, if a highway is engineered for cars to go 120mph (sight lines, camber, traffic signs etc.) and the speed limit is 70mph, it may be safe to go 70mph (but not 120). If there is ponding on the road (due to bad design or maintenance) then slow down to maybe 30mph else you can get hydroplaning.

Other answer:

☺:
Guess you haven't lived in California very long. It rains there, it snows, the earth moves, it catches fine, and there are mud slides when if rains after the fires.

But to answer, don't let your tires get bald, that leads to hydroplaning. Slow down, lights on., wipers on, light foot on brake and gas. If it gets to where you can't see well, and you are running the defrosters on high so the windshield doesn't fog up, pull over and wait a bit until you can see.

Barry:
While a car can operate in most kinds of weather, it is not necessarily safe to drive when the weather is at its absolute worst. Heavy rain, dense fog or smoke and icy slick roads are all examples of times when you should either stay home or pull over and wait. Fortunately, heavy rain like that usually passes quickly.
Periferalist:
Slow down, low beams on, wipers on as fast as they'll shed rain, and if the rain gets too heavy, look for someplace to pull over until it slacks off.
Mark:
I think the obvious answer to this is slow down or just pull off the road and stop. I've pulled off the road plenty of times during summer downpours. Also, if you know the weather will be bad (rain, snow, ice, etc.) and you don't *have* to go somewhere, stay home.
logicalgal:
Drive slower, follow further behind and pull over in a safe place if you feel that it is unsafe for you to continue. Drive very slowly through deep water……there may be a hole under the water, or you could stall your vehicle due to too much water contacting the electrical and computer components.
STEPHEN:
Slow down. It's the people that insist on driving at the speed limit that get into trouble.
StephenWeinstein:
Liquid rainwater does not look like frosted glass. If it looks like frosted glass, that is from condensation on the glass. To make it evaporate, turn on the defroster, the heater, and the air conditioner all at the same time (I know that running the heater and the air conditioner at the same time sounds crazy, but you're not using the air conditioner to cool the air, just to dehumidifier it).
John S:
There is one overriding tip for driving in the rain: SLOW DOWN.
Lauu:
Slow down