How to build a helicopter without an engine?

I have seen an airplane that can fly without an engine. It s the Wright Flyer. If possible to build nothing but pedals like the bike with a bigger gear, is it possible to build a helicopter made of steal and wood before testing for a flight?

No engine, do manually. Use man power to push it with our own sweat. If

I have seen an airplane that can fly without an engine. It s the Wright Flyer. If possible to build nothing but pedals like the bike with a bigger gear, is it possible to build a helicopter made of steal and wood before testing for a flight?

No engine, do manually. Use man power to push it with our own sweat. If you have any thoughts of it, I might think of designing a model for one.

Other answer:

Kevin:
According to me, It's technically not practical to build an engine-less helicopter that operates from human power alone. Has it been done? Yes. Is it something you could do without a lot of money and expertise? No. Could it allow you to go anywhere except hover in calm air for a few seconds or a minute, even if you were an Olympic caliber cyclist? ? No.
Zaphod Beeblebrox:
It's technically not practical to build an engine-less helicopter that operates from human power alone. Has it been done? Yes. Is it something you could do without a lot of money and expertise? No. Could it allow you to go anywhere except hover in calm air for a few seconds or a minute, even if you were an Olympic caliber cyclist? ? No.
STEPHEN:
You can build a helicopter without an engine. But it won't fly.
Fred:
Years ago a guy pedalled a super light weight privately built plane with shrink wrap plastic coated wings across the English channel which I believe is about 22 miles (about 35kms). The guy was a professional bike rider and had a large back up team and of course the weather was closely monitored to find the perfect time to do it.
For the average person I doubt many could do it. I doubt you could do the same for a helicopter.
Eric West:
Sorry, you could never develop sufficient power to lift yourself and a helicopter.

The only aircraft which have flown on human power so have been built with very large, highly efficient, low speed wings and very efficient drive trains and propellers. They have used highly sophisticated and expensive and extremely light weight composite materials and have been flown by highly trained athletes with extreme aerobic fitness.

These projects have had multi-million dollar (in today's terms) budgets, usually supported as University research projects.

Helicopters are nowhere near as efficient at using available power and the weight complexity and strength required of their cyclic and collective control systems add a further weight penalty.

While it might be possible using all of the engineering facilities of someone like NASA or MIT, with the kinds of budget they can command, in your backyard, it ain't going to happen!

PhotonX:
What makes you think the Wright Flyer didn't have an engine? Of course it did, a hand-built gasoline engine, since they weren't able to adapt an existing automotive engine to the task. Their *gliders* didn't have engines, but then, that's why they're called gliders, isn't it? The only airplane ever to fly without an engine was the Gossamer Condor, a man-powered craft, and one or two similar developmental craft, but unless you're an Olympic-class athlete who flies only in zero-wind conditions, and with a vast amount of money to spend, forget it.
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No offense, but you're totally naïve if you think you're going to build a man-powered helicopter in your garage with an utter lack of engineering prowess.
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flyingtiggeruk:
It's hard enough powering a man-powered aircraft and you'd need rather more power for a helicopter where you rather than wings would be providing lift.

I wouldn't build a helicopter out of steel, it would be too heavy. Aluminium or fibreglass would be better.

I'd dig into the link for info about designing and building aircraft

Piero:
Note another's post with a human powered helicopter. The Atlas got off the ground. but it doesn't look like directional stability and control is perfected yet.
Pilsner Man:
Dolt