Should I sell my car?

I have a 2005 Volvo S40. I just got it two weeks ago and two days ago the beloved "check engine" light came on. When taking it to AutoZone, they told me it was a code for the catalytic converter. Now, I paid for this car in cash for $2,300, but the dealer's telling me to fix it, it'll cost between

I have a 2005 Volvo S40. I just got it two weeks ago and two days ago the beloved "check engine" light came on. When taking it to AutoZone, they told me it was a code for the catalytic converter. Now, I paid for this car in cash for $2,300, but the dealer's telling me to fix it, it'll cost between $1,650-$2,200. Not only that, but the weather stripping's starting to leak and the defroster's starting to smell like gasoline and the ceiling's sagging.

Other answer:

Jonathan:
Don't get the dealer to fix it. Take it to am independent shop for a quote. Chances are they will use after market parts, not genuine (expensive) Volvo parts, and work at a cheaper hourly rate. You know the dealer price. so you can tell if the shop is trying to rip you off.

Problem is that with all the faults you list, it will be hard to sell it, at any price. Then if you buy another car for a similar price, it may be no better than this one, and it's CEL might come on after a month as well.

Old cars are cheap because they are starting to wear out, and ARE going to cost money to keep running. The only alternative to this is to buy a new (or nearly new) car, but that costs $$ up front.

Of course if you can afford a better car, then ditch the old one, and just buy something better.

FlagMichael:
You need to take it to your mechanic. It would have been better if he had checked it before you paid money but is certainly better than you throwing money at what a parts man is telling you. The code is P0420, I'm sure, which is produced when the exhaust on the outlet of the downstream catalytic converter has a high and fluctuating level of oxygen where the level should be low and relatively stable. The code is defined as "Catalyst system efficiency below threshold [bank 1]" and is very often taken to mean the converter is bad. I have fixed about a dozen P0420s now for family and friends, and not replaced a converter to do it. By far the most common cause is an exhaust leak ahead of the converter, something a muffler shop can find and fix quite reasonably.

Your mechanic can find the gasoline leak, but the only economical way to fix the falling headliner – a very common problem in Volvos – is by fastening it up with rows of straight pins. I was in a Volvo forum for many years and nobody ever found a better fix for the headliner outside of the very expensive replacement.

thebax2006:
That's an old trick. Erasing the converter P0420 code so it doesn't reset for several key sequences. Sleazy used care salesmen do it all the time so that the money to replace the converter doesn't come out of their commission check for selling the car! Take the car back and accuse the seller of scamming you and threaten them with a law suit id they don't fix it or give you your money back!
Pilsner Man:
The people you bought it from made the mistake of buying a Volvo, you made the HUGE mistake of buying a second hand Volvo. Go to a muffler shop and talk to them.
ioerr:
for a car you got that cheap, that old, I doubt I'd take it to the dealer to fix something like that. you can probably get it fixed a lot cheaper elsewhere, though I guess they wouldn't use a "genuine volvo" cat
VITTORIO:
Hmm! Real smart

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