What is your advice for a teenager driving out of town for the first time?

I have plans to drive across the state to visit a friend of mine next weekend, but it'll be my first time driving out of my small town. The car is reliable, I'll fill up the tank, and get food/drinks, but I'm very nervous. My main fear is driving on highways. More so, merging onto and exiting the

I have plans to drive across the state to visit a friend of mine next weekend, but it'll be my first time driving out of my small town. The car is reliable, I'll fill up the tank, and get food/drinks, but I'm very nervous. My main fear is driving on highways. More so, merging onto and exiting the highway. In my town, there is one highway, speed limit of 40, and it only goes two ways, through the town. No confusing exits or onramps or anything. But to get to my friend's house, it's a 200 mile trip, with several major highways involved. I really want to go but I'm so nervous What can I do to get over this feeling? Thank you in advance, God bless!

Other answer:

Jacob:
Doing something new is always a little scary. That doesn't mean it's dangerous or hard or that you shouldn't do it! You can't really call yourself a driver if you can't do a 200 mile trip. It's just like a shorter trip, but there's more of it. 8^)

Usually your first trip this long you do with someone else. Two heads are better than one, plus it's nice to have company. But there's no reason you can't do it yourself.

I like Gramps' idea of memorizing or writing down the exit before the one you need. Or you could mark a map or you could write a list of turns and directions. Or you could use your cellphone GPS if you have one. I use mine sometimes even if I think I know where I"m going, just because it's helpful to have it call out the turns ahead. But I'm guessing navigation is probably not going to be your problem.

Merging on the highway, just remember that the purpose of the on-ramp is to speed up to match the speed of traffic. The Interstate goes fast but it's actually safer than a minor highway–no intersections, nobody backing out of driveways without looking, nobody coming the other way suddenly making a left turn across your path. Keep a 2-second distance from the car in front of you. Get on and off from the right lane. It's only scary because you haven't done it a lot. After this trip it will be a piece o' cake!

Get everything packed in the car the night before, then go down to the gas station, fill up, check oil, check tires. Then in the morning you just have to run out and hop in the car. Bring some tunez to keep you company. (I like audiobooks myself.)

Stop after 100 miles, even if you don't need gas or to go to the bathroom. Get out of the car and just walk around for 5 min. and take a few deep breaths. It's amazing how much that helps!

Naturally, be careful about talking to strangers, all that stuff. Have a good time!

Ann:
I wish i could reach through here and give you a hug! I am going through some of this right now with my kids. My 16yr old daughter blames me for leaving her dad and hs called me so many nasty names, i am surprised her tongue hasn't fallen out. We are slowly rebuilding our lives. The only advice i can give you is to tell her no matter what you will always love her and be there for her even if she doesn't think she wants you there. Do your best ot to talk aboout your ex in a negative way. My biggest piece of advice is you have to start getting on with your life too. You have to value yourself. I have just started dating again. It is scary but it is fun too. It also might help your daughter see you as a real person not jusdt her mom. I really believe that when they are older and can look at things from an adult perspective they will be more understanding and you can build again fromthere. Hang in there. Be strong. Know in your heart that your kids both love you more than even they know and will come around in the end.
PaperCrane:
You'll be fine, just make sure that you're not sleepy behind the wheel. Stop if you're feeling sleepy, and don't drink before driving. Other than that, just use all of your turn signals, yield to people when necessary, and you'll be fine. When you're actually on the freeway and have been driving for awhile, it will not feel like you're going that fast. It's not that scary. It really isn't. Oh, and have the proper paper work you need, such as documentation of insurance, license, and driver's registration. Perhaps you'll want to print out directions before hand so that you won't have trouble in case your phone dips out. Drive the speed limit and bring lots of snacks. Good luck!
geegee:
Experience is the best way to overcome apprehension over driving on highways. It sounds like you have all the bases covered re gas and car issues. If at all possible, leave at a time that is not rush hour, which can cause roads to be heavily traveled and hectic. Good luck and have fun!!
Erik:
Highway driving is actually much easier than city driving. Just go straight. Go to mapquest and print out a copy of the route, this will help avoid any surprises.
Happy Gramps:
be sure all of the fluids are checked and topped up in the vehicle, not just the fuel + check the spare tire for proper inflation and the jack needed…………..map out your route and make a note of the exits that are 2 away from where you need to exit ( example: if you need to exit at maple ave, look for the 2 exits before maple to insure that you don't miss your exit ); get a map if needed for the area you will be going to or use google maps on your phone if it has it; ask the Lord to guide you :]
Rolo:
A triple A membership or mom/dads credit card # in case of emergency.

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