Why are UK motorcycle laws so messed up?

Is anyone able to point me in the right direction to understand why the UK motorcycle laws are so messed up?

I have been riding for quite some time and think its unfair that the younger generation have to suffer. Don't get me wrong, there are some smashing 125cc bikes, but most of them just don't have the

Is anyone able to point me in the right direction to understand why the UK motorcycle laws are so messed up?

I have been riding for quite some time and think its unfair that the younger generation have to suffer. Don't get me wrong, there are some smashing 125cc bikes, but most of them just don't have the power necessary for the roads.

It also seems unfair that after passing a CBT, riders then have to do a driving test when someone in a car can do a test then go out any buy any car they want.

So why can't riders start on a 300? or even a 250?

End of that mini rant, and back to my original question, can someone point me in the right direction so I can find out why the laws are as messed up as they are?

Best Answer:

Mark: "Why are UK motorcycle laws so messed up"

Simple answer – because we are part of the EU ( not for much longer :))

Our driving test regulations, particularly motorcycles, stem from European Directives.

They direct that we have a 2 part practical test. They direct that the off road part has to be in a 140 metre x 40 metre fenced of area.
Despite the fact we use feet/yards.
They direct the hazzard avoidance part of the test must be done at 50kph.
Despite the fact we use, and our speedometers are marked, in mph.

Yes it is stupid BUT the question you pose suggests that one should be able to complete a CBT and be on a par with someone passing a car driving test. CBT stands for Compulsory Basic Training.
It is just that BASIC Training. It is not a test.
To get to an acceptable standard to pass a test in a car takes many hours of tuition.
A CBT is a days training. A days training is not going to get you to test standard.

It does however the advantage that it allows a 17 year old to take basic training and then ride ( up to 125cc) without supervision and enjoy the freedom of the road (except motorways).
Be thankful for small mercies.

Other answer:

Mark:
"So why can't riders start on a 300? or even a 250?"

Before 1960, you could ride anything with 'L' plates. Due to the high fatality rates, learners were restricted to bikes of less than 250cc, from 1960 onwards. However, so many novice riders were getting killed and injured, that learners were restricted to 125's in 1983. Then it was found that new riders were still getting killed and injured, so the anyone under 19 was restricted to 125cc and older riders (up to 24 years old) were limited to bikes of less than 47bhp.

M.A.G. is a good place to start, as for why we have these laws:
http://www.mag-uk.org/en/campaigns

And here's a brief history of motorcycle learner laws in Britain:
http://lightningpass.com/changes-motorcy…

However, I agree – NONE of that justifies why a 17 year old can pass their Category B test, and drive absolutely any car they can afford the insurance for….

Candid Chris:
Best answer- BECAUSE…. (accept that or don't, LOL!).

Don't know where you live or if you've ever been to London but the laws are made in London and having ridden there once and it was a traffic nightmare for this wide-open space rider from the States, so sorta understand. The area(s) away from London aren't too bad for riding bigger bikes so I guess they can't restrict riding only to LONDON ONLY Laws (would be a great start-up business, pull your Hayabusa 1300 IN and rent/lease a 125 for in-town traffic, LOL! again)

As said- BECAUSE….

Timbo is here:
1. A CBT is not a test. It is a very BASIC course
2. Before the law was made as it is now teens were dying too often on bikes they could not handle.
3. Nothing ever got changed after some teen said "That's so unfair and messed up" so you may as well forget it as the grown ups have it all sewn up.
Tim D:
When I took my UK riding test it involved riding around the block a couple of times, stopping when a man with a clipboard stepped out from behind a tree, then identifying half a dozen road signs and away you go, buy what you can afford to insure.

This led to a fairly large number of young men launching themselves into walls and buses, the response has been increasing the number of hoops we have to jump through, in modern times those hoops have come from Belgium, but they are, in part, framed by DfT recommendations.

STEPHEN:
You think UK laws are messed up because learners have to use 125CC?
Modern 250s would be killers for inexperienced kids.